Basic computer language commands

Basic computer programming language

ERROR Statement

Purpose:

To simulate the occurrence of an error, or to allow the user to define error codes.

Syntax:

ERROR integer expression

Comments:

The value of integer expression must be greater than 0 and less than 255.

If the value of integer expression equals an error code already in use by GW-BASIC, the ERROR statement simulates the occurrence of that error, and the corresponding error message is printed.

A user-defined error code must use a value greater than any used by the GW- BASIC error codes. There are 76 GW-BASIC error codes at present. It is preferable to use a code number high enough to remain valid when more error codes are added to GW-BASIC.

User-defined error codes may be used in an error-trapping routine.

If an ERROR statement specifies a code for which no error message has been defined, GW-BASIC responds with the message "Unprintable Error".

Execution of an ERROR statement for which there is no error-trapping routine causes an error message to be printed and execution to halt.

Examples:

The following examples simulate error 15 (the code for "String too long"):

10 S=10
20 T=5
30 ERROR S+T
40 END
RUN
 String too long in 30

Or, in direct mode:

ERROR 15          (you type this line)
 String too long  (GW-BASIC types this line)

The following example includes a user-defined error code message.

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110 ON ERROR GOTO 400
120 INPUT "WHAT IS YOUR BET";B
130 IF B>5000 THEN ERROR 210
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400 IF ERR=210 THEN PRINT "HOUSE LIMIT IS $5000"
410 IF ERL=130 THEN RESUME 120
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